Community Issues Gatherings: A Tool For Resolving Controversy

Contact:  Ron Hustedde, ronald.hustedde@uky.edu

Description:  This brief article walks through key considerations around community issues gathering.

URL:  http://www.comm-dev.org/images/pdf/CDPractice-Issue1.pdf

Keywords:   Community, controversy, issue gathering

Target Audiences:   Community, Extension professionals

 

 

Can the Practice of Mindfulness Reduce Unconscious Racial Bias?

Contact:  Karen Pace,  pace1@msu.edu

Description:  Efforts to create inclusive and equitable settings may be strengthened by including the practice of mindfulness.  This short article provides some starting thoughts.

URL:  http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/can_the_practice_of_mindfulness_reduce_unconscious_racial_bias

Keywords:   Mindfulness, racial bias

Target Audiences:   Communities, Extension professionals, university professionals

Best Practices for Outreach and Engagement to Latino Audiences using Community-Based Programs

Contact:  Liliana Vega, liliana@uidaho.edu

Description:  The Latino community continues to grow at an increasing rate.  Latinos have become the “majority-minority,” and by 2043, minorities will be the majority in the U.S. with Latinos as the largest ethnic minority group.  The lack of targeted programming to ethnically diverse audiences is a growing concern for many organizations.  This article describes research-based strategies and best practices for providing culturally appropriate Extension programs to the Latino community.

URL:  http://media.wix.com/ugd/c8fe6e_8973a5d2faf24bc2af9c9508e46beb98.pdf

Keywords:  Latino, Hispanic, Latino outreach, Latino programs, minority outreach, outreach & engagement, Latino youth development

Target Audiences:  Individuals,Community,Elected/appointed leaders, Extension professionals

Annotated Bibliography of Structural Racism Present in the U.S. Food System

Contact:  Rich Pirog, rspirog@msu.edu

Description:  This annotated bibliography provides current research and outreach on structural racism in the U.S. food system for the food system practitioner, researcher, and educator. Structural racism in the United States has been defined as the “normalization and legitimization of an array of dynamics—historical, cultural, institutional, and interpersonal—that routinely advantage whites while producing cumulative and chronic outcomes for people of color.”

URL:  http://foodsystems.msu.edu/resources/structural_racism_in_us_food_system

Keywords:   Food systems, structural racism

Target Audiences:  Food system practioners, Extension professionals, researchers, educators

An Evaluation of the National Issues Forum Methodology for Stimulating Deliberation in Rural Kentucky

Contact:  Ron Hustedde, ronald.hustedde@uky.edu

Description:  Deliberation is implicit in the community development literature. Yet it is seldom addressed as a topic in its own right. Deliberation is defined as the weighing of policy choices by the public. It involves critical thinking and open dialogue that creates a sense of the public and the movement towards a common ground. This article address the problems associated with deliberation: 1) hyperindividualism; 2) a culture of limited public dialogue; and 3) the increased hegemony of science and technology. The National Issues Forum (NIF) methodology was employed as a tool to overcome these problems of deliberation in rural Kentucky. A naturalistic evaluation model was used to critique the application of NIF in rural settings. The ten lessons learned contain insights about the problems, successes and the limitations associated with the NIF methodology for stimulating deliberation.

URL:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15575339609489807

Keywords:  Public deliberation,National Issues Forum, hyper individualism,  public dialogue

Target Audiences:  Extension professionals

Tips for Talking about Race

Contact:  Division of Inclusion, Diversity and Equity, University of Missouri, diversity@missouri.edu

Description:  This 3-page document provides strategies for thoughtfully engaging in conversations about race.

URL:  https://diversity.missouri.edu/education/handouts/talk-about-race.pdf

Keywords:  Facilitation, race

Target Audiences:  Academicians, university personnel, Extension professionals

The Language of Identity

Contact:  Division of Inclusion, Diversity and Equity, University of Missouri, diversity@missouri.edu

Description:  Words can significantly impact our interaction with others. Regardless of our motive and intentions, they may harm or enhance dialogue. Learning about the most current terminology also encourages a more productive dialogue about diversity and inclusion. Use this guide to begin learning about inclusive language.

URL:  https://diversity.missouri.edu/education/handouts/inclusive-language.pdf

Keywords:  Diversity, language, word choice, bias, inclusion

Target Audiences:  Individuals, Extension professionals, community

Speak Up! Identifying and Confronting Bias and Prejudice

Contact:  Division of Inclusion, Diversity and Equity, University of Missouri, diversity@missouri.edu

Description:  This nine page document provides some foundational guideance on confronting bias and prejudice.

URL:  https://diversity.missouri.edu/education/handouts/speak-up.pdf

Keywords:  diversity, language, word choice, bias, inclusion

Target Audiences:  individuals, Extension professionals, community

Guide to Facilitating Dialogues

Contact:  Division of Inclusion, Diversity and Equity, University of Missouri, diversity@missouri.edu

Description:  Dialogue facilitators do not need to be experts on the topic being discussed. Good facilitators help establish a safe environment where participants can discuss complex and often emotionally-charged issues. Facilitators also help participants understand that the dialogue is a learning experience and not a forum for participants to voice their opinions without listening to others.  This short fact sheet provides some initial thoughts to guide a facilitator.

URL:  https://diversity.missouri.edu/education/handouts/facilitating-dialogue.pdf

Keywords:  diversity, language, word choice, bias, inclusion

Target Audiences:  individuals, Extension professionals, community