Energy Supply Forecast

The U.S. relies on coal and imported oil for much of its energy needs. Coal is not a favorable energy source despite ample reserves in the U.S. because of its high carbon, sulfur (which causes acid rain) and mercury emissions. Reducing energy demand, especially for imported sources, would reduce the potential for disruptions in the future. There are currently many efforts to find renewable energy alternatives such as cellulosic ethanol or biodiesel to replace liquid fuels.

The U. S. Energy Information Administration analysis of energy supply and demand through 2035 (Figure 1.4) anticipates:

  • Moderate growth in energy consumption,
  • Increased use of renewable energy,
  • Declining reliance on imported liquid fuels.
Figure 1.4: U.S. Primary Energy Consumption, quadrillion Btu, 1980-2035. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035. Retrieved from: http://www.eia.gov/oiaf/archive/aeo10/demand.html

Figure 1.4: U.S. Primary Energy Consumption, quadrillion Btu, 1980-2035. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035. Retrieved from: http://www.eia.gov/oiaf/archive/aeo10/demand.html