Current Trends in U.S. Energy Production and Consumption

Figure 1.2: U.S. Prime Energy Consumption by Energy. Source: 2011 U.S. Energy demand is met by multiple sources, including petroleum, natural gas, coal, nuclear electric power, and renewable energy.  Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review, March 2012 (preliminary 2011 data). Retrieved from: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=renewable_home

Figure 1.2: U.S. Prime Energy Consumption by Energy. Source: 2011 U.S. Energy demand is met by multiple sources, including petroleum, natural gas, coal, nuclear electric power, and renewable energy. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review, March 2012 (preliminary 2011 data). Retrieved from: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=renewable_home

 

The pattern of fuel use varies widely by sector (i.e. the transportation sector relies heavily on petroleum sources, while very little petroleum is used for electrical generation). Figure 1.3 illustrates the distribution of energy resources by sector, and the primary sources of energy per sector.

Figure 1.3: Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Review 2010. Tables 1.3, 2.1b-2, 1f, 10.3, and 10.4 (October 2011). Retrieved from: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=us_energy_home

Figure 1.3: Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Review 2010. Tables 1.3, 2.1b-2, 1f, 10.3, and 10.4 (October 2011). Retrieved from: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=us_energy_home

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